The Essence of Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan

The Essence of Lange's Cascading Beneficiary Plan

Learn how Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan can help ease your worries for your family’s financial future.

Somewhat tongue-in-cheek, I refer to “Leave it to Beaver” families as the perfect candidates for the Lange Cascading Beneficiary Plan (LCPB). Just to be clear about what I mean by that, I am showing you a basic version of the family tree for that type of family. Blended families with children from different unions sometimes need to have estate planning with more complicated beneficiary designations. It is not that the LCBP cannot work, but it is not as straightforward. With that in mind, let’s look at the essence of Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan.

Lange Cascading Beneficiary Plan example photo

It is important to think long-term with financial planning using the Lange Cascading Beneficiary Plan.

In previous content of the Lange Cascading Beneficiary Plan series, I have discussed the tax and long-term estate planning benefits of leaving your IRA and retirement accounts, when possible, to the youngest members of your extended family to get the longest stretch possible. Remember, keeping money in the tax-deferred environment (traditional IRAs and retirement plans) or the tax-free environment (Roth IRA etc.) for as long as possible works to your heirs’ advantage.

But, let’s be realistic. Even if you understand that the tax benefits are greater when you leave your IRA to your grandchildren, most couples want to ensure that their surviving spouse will be financially sound with enough discretionary money to lead a happy and fulfilling life. So, if we take that attitude, it might seem that the simplest and safest route is to simply leave all your money to your surviving spouse.

Or, you make some calculations and decide your surviving spouse will probably be fine with most of your IRA but some of it could go to the kids upon the first death. Maybe your plan works out perfectly, but maybe it doesn’t.  Let’s look at an example. You have a two-million-dollar IRA, and you think, based on future calculations that your spouse will only need about $1,500,000.

You could make your children the beneficiaries of $500,000 at your death. Conducting your estate planning in this manner could provide your children with some inheritance after the death of the first parent. It might be very useful to them, especially if they have children of their own that will be needing money for school or facing other monetary challenges associated with raising a family.

The financial market is in constant flux, keep that in mind when making plans.

That sounds like a great plan but what happens if the market takes a big dive? The two million you thought was going to be there has dropped to 1.5 million, and you have designated $500,000 of that to go to the children. Now, your surviving spouse has less money to live on, and you fail to meet your objective of providing for your spouse. That would be horrible. Divvying up an estate appropriately is one of the biggest hurdles of estate planning.

So, you go back to square one, and leave everything to your surviving spouse outright.  Down the road, your family will likely have to give up more in taxes. Furthermore, if changes in the tax code modify the advantages of the stretch IRA, you could potentially forfeit the tax advantages that might be offered to compensate a bit for the loss. There was talk, for instance, of allowing $450,000 of an Inherited IRA to be stretched over a lifetime, and this exemption allowance would be available to both spouses.

If your estate planning leaves everything to your spouse, you forfeit one $450,000 exemption. Whereas, if the first spouse to die leaves $450,000 to the kids (giving them the advantage of the stretch), then when the second spouse dies, the children can take advantage of the second exclusion and stretch another $450,000. That is a big difference.

This is why the Lange Cascading Beneficiary Plan is right for you.

What we come back to time and again, is that we don’t have a crystal ball that allows us to plan for the future with any confidence that we are making decisions that will be appropriate for the circumstances at that time. That is precisely why the LCBP is so effective. You can draft the documents in such a way that your surviving spouse (with the help of an advisor and perhaps the grown children) can make good decisions about allocating the estate that are both tax-savvy and in the best interest of the family.

Picking up on our previous example where the stock market took a dive and there is less money overall for the surviving spouse. Under the terms of the LCBP, he or she could say, “Hey, I’d love to help the kids out, but I need all the money.” End of story, surviving spouse just keeps everything and we get a good result.

The essence of the LCBP will put you at ease.

Alternatively the surviving spouse has more than enough money for long-term security and a comfortable lifestyle, so he or she decides that money should go to the kids. So, with the cascade in place, divided among the children equally, and with disclaimers available, the surviving parent can look at each child’s situation and help them in the way that makes the most sense. Perhaps one child has a bright financial future, and it would make more sense to pass money onto their children (the grandchildren). In that instance, the first child could disclaim their portion directly to their children via well-drafted trusts.

Second child would love to do the same, but actually, he or she could use the money.  So, he or she accepts the inheritance, and does not disclaim to his or her children. Flexibility works. And, a further advantage is that none of these decisions must be made quickly. The family has nine months after the first death to finalize all decisions. A little breathing room after a crisis can be very welcome.

With documents that offer flexibility, you don’t have to predict the future to provide for your family in a way that makes sense for the time. Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan allows for terrific post-mortem planning that can make an enormous difference for the family.

Next week, we will examine estate planning with the potential $450,000 exclusion in more detail.

See you soon!

P.S. If you want to do a little advanced study on this topic before the next post and video, go to http://paytaxeslater.com/estate-planning/.

The Incredible Tax Advantage of Young Beneficiaries

Let’s Talk About Your Kids:
The Advantage of Estate Planning with Young Beneficiaries

The Incredible Tax Advantage of Young Beneficiaries

Let’s talk about your beneficiaries, your kids and grand kids.

In the second video in this series, we learned that estate planning that leaves retirement assets directly to children and grandchildren offers extraordinary tax advantages to your family.  The basic premise being that a young beneficiary has a long life-expectancy, and sustaining money in the tax deferred environment for an extended period allows for the most growth. At least this is how things work under the current law.

I think we can agree that, in drafting estate planning documents, the primary concern for most couples is to provide for the surviving spouse. As we have discussed, transferring assets to a spouse is a fairly straightforward process and does have some tax advantages. Then, they hope that when they are both gone, there will be something left for their kids, and then for their grandchildren.  But, I am suggesting that, depending on family circumstances, it might be smart to leave money to kids or grandkids at the first death.

Let’s say that after you die, your spouse is in good health and has more money than he or she will ever need.  Under those circumstances, you have met our first criteria for an estate plan:  providing for the surviving spouse.  In this case, leaving at least a portion of your IRA to your children is perhaps a viable and tax-savvy option.  With their longer life expectancy, they will have lower required minimum distributions which means more of your money will continue to grow tax-deferred.  Flexible estate planning at its finest! It’s a winning scenario, especially if you look at the family as a whole with the idea of establishing a legacy.

If we take it one step further with your beneficiaries.

It’s even better, tax-wise, to name your grandchildren.  Imagine the advantages of minimizing tax-free distributions from an inherited Roth account over a long lifetime! If you scroll up to video two in the series, you can watch me run the numbers for just that scenario.  It’s a game-changing strategy.

We cannot over-stress, however, that naming minor children or grandchildren as beneficiaries will also require some additional estate planning to protect them from themselves—no Ferrari at 21 for you my grandson—and, potentially, creditors.  We recommend that all minors’ shares are held in well-drafted trusts.  Additionally, it is critical that the trust meets five specific conditions to qualify as a designated beneficiary of an IRA or a Roth IRA (you can find reference to the five conditions in my book, Retire Secure! on Page 307, and you can download a copy of the book at www.paytaxeslater.com/books. Under current law, a well-drafted trust will allow them to stretch an inherited IRA or Roth IRA over their lifetime. If the trust doesn’t meet all five of the conditions, then the trust will not qualify as a beneficiary and income taxes will be accelerated. Without attention to the details, it could go from an estate planning dream to a nightmare.

So, let’s pull it all together.

Even if you have specific bequests that you want to see honored—a gift to a charity or a cause or a family friend—I suspect that it is still safe to say that your primary beneficiaries will be your surviving spouse, your children, and your grandchildren.  That being the case, stay tuned to learn why Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan is probably the best estate planning solution for you.

Until next time!

-Jim

 

P.S. If you want to do a little advanced study on this topic before the next post and video, go to http://paytaxeslater.com/estate-planning/.

Beyond “I Love You” Wills: Tax Advantaged Estate Planning With Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan

Estate Planning Goals:
What Do Most Families Want?

What do most couples want from estate planning and their Wills?

Welcome back for the fourth video blog post in my series on Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan: the best estate plan for married couples.

So, let’s talk a minute about estate planning goals in general and forget about taxes.  What do most couples want from estate planning?  They want to be sure that, no matter what, the surviving spouse will be safe and secure.  If they have kids and grandkids, they want to take care of them too.  This typically leads to what I call an I Love You will.  And truly, it’s a great place to start.  Most I Love You wills are simple and to the point:  Husband leaves everything to his wife.  Wife leaves everything to her husband.  Once they both die, the remainder goes to their children in equal shares.  And if, for some reason one or more of the children predecease the parents, that child’s share would go to his or her own children—hopefully in well-drafted trusts.  As I said, I am a huge fan of I Love You wills.  But, returning to the topic of taxes…we can optimize estate planning when we start thinking of the tax consequences for individual family members, and how that affects the family as a whole.

What’s great about the I Love You Wills

Okay, so what is great about the I Love You wills that name the spouse as the primary beneficiary and then the children equally?

  1. It provides for the surviving spouse. As such, it meets our primary objective.
  2. When you direct your assets to your spouse at death, there is no income tax on the transfer of your IRA or other retirement plans. With a tax-deferred plan, your spouse will continue taking required minimum distributions (RMD).  If a Roth IRA passes to the surviving spouse, there are no RMDs, and it can continue growing tax-free for the rest of his or her life.
  3. With the death of the second spouse, what’s left goes to the children.

That covers the basics.

What can be improved from with I Love You Wills?

Now, let’s look at what we might improve from the basic I Love You estate planning.  If you remember in the second video of this series, we looked at the nitty-gritty of what happens to your IRA after death.  Assuming the IRA distribution rules currently in place, you learned that a child’s required minimum distribution of an inherited IRA would be much lower than the required minimum distribution of the IRA for the spouse.  So, if financial circumstances permit, passing the IRA to a child defers taxes for a much longer period.  And, if we are looking the big tax-picture estate planning for the whole family, that is an advantageous tax strategy.  The tax advantage only improves if a grandchild is the beneficiary.  We can implement this tax-advantaged strategy if the disclaimers associated with Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan are in place.

The critical component with this type of estate planning is flexibility.  Having options that can maximize the tax benefits to the family based on the financial/life circumstances at the time of the first death is both comforting and smart.   Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan takes all the benefits of the I Love You will and adds flexibility and potentially enormous tax advantages.

In our next video blog, we will look at some of the best ways to plan in the face of uncertainty.

See you soon!

Jim

P.S. If you want to do a little advanced study on this topic before the next post and video, go to http://paytaxeslater.com/estate-planning/.

The Best & Most Flexible Solution for Your Estate Planning Concerns: Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan

The Ultimate in Flexible Estate Planning:
Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan

The Ultimate in Flexible Estate Planning: Lange's Cascading Beneficiary Plan

This post is the first of series on Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan, the gold standard in estate planning for traditional married couples.

What is Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan?

Estate planning would be so much easier if we just had a crystal ball. We simply cannot predict the future with much confidence. And the unknowns stretch beyond the plan rules, tax laws, and the investment environment. Family and financial circumstances can change dramatically over time as well. So we are faced with questions like: How much money will you have? How much money will you need? How many grandchildren will you have? Who will live the longest?  An estate plan that is intricately thought through and seems in-line with your testamentary intent today could be completely inappropriate once you die.

In the early nineties, I began thinking creatively about this problem. My objective was to revolutionize my firm’s estate planning practice by drafting documents that could accommodate changing circumstances—the key, as I saw it, would be flexibility within a reasonable set of assumptions. Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan, as it came to be called, uses specific language and disclaimers to provide the most flexibility when it is needed the most—at the time of the death of the first spouse when the surviving spouse and the family have the most current picture of their finances and family dynamics.  We were aiming for less guess work decades in advance!

I thought it was the best thing since sliced bread!  And it turns out, I wasn’t alone.  Not only did my estate planning clients love the idea of giving the surviving spouse the option to make important financial decisions at the time of the first death, Jane Bryant Quinn did too.  She picked up on it through an article I wrote and sent out to my email list.  She first published a description of Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan in Newsweek and from there, it has been featured in dozens of major publications like The Wall Street Journal and Kiplinger’s.  The plan is also featured in my flagship book, Retire Secure!, along with other nuggets of my best retirement and estate planning recommendations.  (By the way, you can download a free copy of the book from www.paytaxeslater.com/books or buy it on Amazon if you’d like a hard copy)!

We have been drafting this type of plan now for more than 25 years.  It works beautifully with our other cutting-edge strategies including stretch IRAs, Roth IRA conversions, and inventive gifting plans. Clients are happy knowing they have flexibility built into their plans, and sadly, but realistically, we have had to execute many plans over the years.  Fortunately, we have also been there to witness the peace of mind that the surviving spouse and heirs get from knowing they are making the best decisions possible given the circumstances.

What to expect in this series:

Over the next few weeks, I am going to spell out the details of Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan.  Sure, I might slip in a current event post or two, but I am going to focus on providing you with a full understanding of what I truly believe to be the best in estate planning for traditional married couples.  I’ll explain which situations LCBP is best suited for, walk you step-by-step though the decision making, discuss how it can be adjusted to fit almost any situation to provide the greatest flexibility and tax savings, and tell you why flexibility will be more important than ever.

Let’s face it, tax changes are coming in our near future, but they will also inevitably change again in the more distant future. That is the nature of the beast. So, having a plan that can adjust to changes, that doesn’t fix things in stone, can give you a measure of comfort that you won’t end up with estate planning documents that have to be redrafted with every single change!  In my opinion, one of the best things you can do for your family is to develop a smart and flexible estate plan that saves them from additional stress and anxiety when you are gone.

Thanks for reading, as always, and stop back soon!

-Jim

P.S. If you want to do a little advanced study on this topic before the next post and video, go to http://paytaxeslater.com/estate-planning/.

 

Stop the Sneaky Tax!

It’s Time to Stop the Sneaky Tax!

Those of you who follow my blog know that I have been somewhat obsessed with the legislation that I call the Death of the Stretch IRA.  If you’re new to my blog, please read some of the preceding posts – they’ll tell you just how much this legislation will cost IRA owners.  The worst part of the Death of the Stretch IRA is that most beneficiaries (your children and grandchildren) won’t have a clue about how much of their inheritance they have lost to taxes.  When they inherit your IRA after you die, your beneficiaries will suddenly have more money than they had before.  Our government is counting on them to be content with their higher bank balance, and is hoping that they never notice that an enormous chunk of their inheritance ended up in Uncle Sam’s pockets before the remainder found its way to them.   That’s what makes this tax so nefarious and, well, sneaky!

Our government has a lot of expensive problems right now – they’re looking to come up with a viable heath care system, build a wall on our southern border and I can’t even begin to imagine how much it will cost to repair the damage done by Hurricane Harvey.  The Treasury doesn’t even have enough money to pay for their day-to-day operations, much less all of this – they’re going to be raising the debt ceiling next month!  I’d bet my own IRA on the fact that the government is planning to include the Death of the Stretch IRA – and the $1 Trillion in revenue that it will generate – as part of an appropriations or budget action that will be voted on before the end of 2017.

You Can Help Stop the Sneaky Tax

If you are a loyal reader, you know that we have been writing our clients and friends to warn them about the sneaky tax, and working on solutions to minimize the damage that this legislation will do.  Now it’s time to send a shot across their bow and tell the government that they’d better find their revenue someplace else besides your IRA.  We are asking your help to start a grass-roots protest against the Sneaky Tax which would kill the stretch IRA—an incredibly useful estate planning tool.  This new law would be so absolutely devastating to so many families across the country, our clients included, that we can’t just sit by and watch it happen.

Write Your Congressman Now

Please help us get the message to our legislators that we will not stand for them picking the pockets of our children and grandchildren.  Please consider going to www.stopthesneakytax.com to add your name to the list of people who are unhappy with this proposed new law and send an email to your Congressmen asking them to say NO to the sneaky tax.  You can also keep up to date with what is going on with this law by joining our new private Facebook group: SOS Save Our Stretch!  Stop the Sneaky Tax!  You can join the group by going to www.saveourstretch.com.  For a limited time, joining the Facebook group will entitle you to a free Advance Reader Copy of Jim’s newest book – The 5 Greatest Tax-Saving Strategies for Protecting Your Family from the New Tax Law.

Sign our Petition to STOP Washington’s Planned Trillion Dollar IRA Sneaky Tax at www.stopthesneakytax.com.

Join our Facebook Group for breaking news and updates at www.saveourstretch.com.

And please forward this to everyone you know who has an IRA!

-Jim

Action you can take:
Forward this petition to all of your friends’
Join our Facebook Group and for a limited time get a FREE advanced reader copy of my upcoming book dedicated to stopping the sneaky tax.

You can view my previous posts on the Death of the Stretch IRA by clicking the links below;

Will New Rules for Inherited IRAs Mean the Death of the Stretch IRA?
Are There Any Exceptions to the Death of the Stretch IRA Legislation?
How will your Required Minimum Distributions Work After the Death of the Stretch IRA Legislation?
Can a Charitable Remainder Unitrust (CRUT) Protect your Heirs from the Death of the Stretch IRA?
What Should You Be Doing Now to Protect your Heirs from the Death of the Stretch IRA?
How Does The New DOL Fiduciary Rule Affect You?
Why is the Death of the Stretch IRA legislation likely to pass?
The Exclusions for the Death of the Stretch IRA
Using Gifting and Life Insurance as a Solution to the Death of the Stretch IRA
Using Roth Conversions as a Possible Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA
How Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan can help protect your family against the Death of the Stretch IRA
How Flexible Estate Planning Can be a Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA
President Trump’s Tax Reform Proposal and How it Might Affect You
Getting Social Security Benefits Right with the Death of the Stretch IRA
The Best Age to Apply for Social Security Benefits after the Death of the Stretch IRA
Part II: The Best Age to Apply for Social Security Benefits after the Death of the Stretch IRA
Social Security Options After Divorce: Don’t Overlook the Possibilities Just Because You Hate Your Ex
Is Your Health the Best Reason to Wait to Apply for Social Security?
Roth IRA Conversions and the Death of the Stretch IRA
How Roth IRA Conversions can help Minimize the Effects of the Death of the Stretch IRA
How Roth IRA Conversions Can Benefit You Even if The Death of Stretch IRA Doesn’t Pass
The Death of the Stretch IRA: Will the Rich Get Richer?
The Best Time for Roth IRA conversions: Before or After the Death of the Stretch IRA?
Roth IRA Conversions and the Death of the Stretch IRA
Part II: How Roth IRA Conversions Can Help Protect You Against the Death of the Stretch IRA
Roth IRA Recharacterizations and the Death of the Stretch IRA
The Risk of Roth IRA Recharacterizations & The Death of the Stretch IRA

How Flexible Estate Planning Can Save Your Children Money

Using Flexible Estate Planning as a Possible Solution for the Death of the Stretch IRA

How Flexible Estate Planning Can Save Your Children Money

The previous posts in this series discuss the proposed legislation that would spell the Death of the Stretch IRA, and offer some ideas that you might be able to incorporate into your own estate plan to reduce its devastating effects. This post will show you how flexible planning can minimize the damage that income taxes could do to your childrenís inheritances after the Death of the Stretch IRA.

The $450,000 Exclusion, Use it or Lose it!

I want to go into detail about something that I first mentioned in my post of February 28, 2017, which was the proposed $450,000 exclusion to the Death of the Stretch IRA legislation. The proposed legislation said that each IRA owner would be entitled to their own exclusion of $450,000. Regardless of how many retirement accounts you own, and how many beneficiaries you name on them, it is critical that you donít overlook the fundamental step of making sure that your exclusion can be used after your death. If you donít use it, you will lose it!

Readers who have been around as long as I have may remember estate planning in the late 90ís, when the top federal estate tax rate was an outrageous 55% and only $600,000 of your estate could be protected from it. And in order to protect more of your assets from the IRS, attorneys had to draft elaborate trusts (often referred to as marital, or A/B trusts) which would allow each spouse to have a $600,000 exclusion of their own. That way, a total of $1.2 million of your familyís money could be exempted and would pass to your children without being subject to federal estate tax. Remember those days?

Common Beneficiary Language Can Cause Your Heirs to Lose an Exclusion

Well, now you have to think the same way about the $450,000 exclusion that is proposed in the Death of the Stretch IRA legislation. The proposal says that the change will apply only to the extent that an individualís aggregate account balances exceed the exclusion amount. But what do most people do when they fill out their beneficiary forms? They say, I want my spouse to have this money, and if my spouse dies before me, I want it to go to my children. Sound familiar? Well, suppose you have $450,000 in an IRA, and your spouse has $450,000 in an IRA. You die, your spouse rolls your IRA in to her own IRA, and now she has $900,000. In an earlier post, I told you that your spouse is an exempt beneficiary ñ so any money that you leave to her wouldnít have been subject to the $450,000 exclusion anyway. But suppose your spouse dies a week after you do. Since her IRA was worth $900,000 when she died, your children can only exclude $450,000. So half of her account could be sheltered under the old IRA rules, but the remainder would be subject to the proposed new IRA rules.

A Better Plan – Use Both Exclusions

A better plan would be to make sure that, if possible, you and your spouse can use both of your exclusions. For example, suppose you have $1 million in an IRA, and your spouse has $1 million in her own IRA. Both of you have estate planning documents that give your surviving spouse the right to disclaim to the next beneficiary in line. You die, and now your spouse has a decision to make. Sheís your beneficiary, and she can accept your IRA if she feels she needs the money. But suppose she doesnít need all of it? She could say, ìIíll be quite comfortable with only $550,000 of this, plus the $1 million from my own IRA.î In that case $450,000 of your IRA would go to the next beneficiary in line ñ your children. Since the amount that your spouse disclaims is within the exclusion amount, $450,000 of your IRA will go to your children and can be distributed according to the old rules. Then when your spouse dies, her entire IRA will pass to your children and they can exclude $450,000 of her IRA from the new rules too.

Flexible Estate Planning is the Key

Flexible estate planning allows your surviving spouse to decide who gets what after your death, and is the key to minimizing the harsh effects that the Death of the Stretch IRA legislation will bring if it is passed. Stop back soon for some more random thoughts!

-Jim

For more information on this topic, please visit our Death of the Stretch IRA resource.

 

P.S. Did you miss a video blog post? Here are the past video blog posts in this video series.

Will New Rules for Inherited IRAs Mean the Death of the Stretch IRA?

Are There Any Exceptions to the Death of the Stretch IRA Legislation?

How will your Required Minimum Distributions Work After the Death of the Stretch IRA Legislation?

Can a Charitable Remainder Unitrust (CRUT) Protect your Heirs from the Death of the Stretch IRA?

What Should You Be Doing Now to Protect your Heirs from the Death of the Stretch IRA?

How Does The New DOL Fiduciary Rule Affect You?

Why is the Death of the Stretch IRA legislation likely to pass?

The Exclusions for the Death of the Stretch IRA

Using Gifting and Life Insurance as a Solution to the Death of the Stretch IRA

Using Roth Conversions as a Possible Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA

How Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan can help protect your family against the Death of the Stretch IRA

How Flexible Estate Planning Can be a Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA

How Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan can help protect your family against the Death of the Stretch IRA

Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan may be a good option to protect your family against the Death of the Stretch IRA

Using Langes Cascading Beneficiary Program as a Possible Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA James Lange

When I meet with new clients for the first time, one of the most aggravating things that I often find is that their existing estate planning documents are “set in stone”, and can cause the estate to be subject to unnecessary taxes.  What do I mean by that?

Let’s say you have Jack and Jill, and their three kids John, James and Judy.   Jack is 87, and Jill is 86.  Jack and Jill both had wills that said, “I want my spouse to inherit everything, but if he or she is dead then I want my children to get everything.”  Sound familiar?   After Jack and Jill both die, their assets will be passed on to their kids as they specified, most certainly.  The problem is that their kids will more than likely end up with less money than they could have.

Why is that?  Jack dies, leaving $3 million to his wife.  Is it really likely that Jill is going to need $3 million to live on for the rest of her life?  Probably not.  The vast majority of wealthy individuals that I’ve worked with are in that position because they have never led an extravagant lifestyle, and in my experience, leopards don’t change their spots all that easily.    More than likely, what will happen is that, a few years down the road, Jill will die with even more money in the bank.  Their hard-earned savings will eventually go to their children as they wanted, but Jack and Jill may have missed the chance to use Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan and possibly save them a significant amount of taxes due on their inheritance.

Using Disclaimers in Your Estate Plan

A disclaimer simply means that your beneficiary says “I don’t want this money that I’ve been given”.  So let’s assume that Jack names Jill as his primary beneficiary, and their three children as contingent beneficiaries.  After Jack’s death, Jill has nine months to think about it and, if she says “I want that money”, she gets it.  But what happens if Jill is terminally ill and doesn’t expect to live much longer?  She can disclaim the money say “I will never live long enough to spend $3 million, but I would like to have $300,000 for my own use.  The remaining $2.7 million can go directly to our kids.”  Jill can’t change what Jack has instructed – meaning that she can’t cause one child to receive more money than what he specified, or ask that some of the money be given to their grandchildren if Jack didn’t include them as beneficiaries.  But she can step aside and say “I don’t need all of this money; give it to the next one in line”.  By disclaiming, Jill allows Jack’s money to be passed directly to their children if she doesn’t need it.  In many cases, disclaiming can be far more tax-efficient than having Jill inherit all of the money, never using it, and then passing on to their children.

Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan (LCBP)

Many years ago, I designed a groundbreaking concept that I call Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan.  It incorporates the use of disclaimers into the estate plan, which allows your surviving spouse to have maximum flexibility after your death.  This type of flexible estate planning can make a huge difference for your beneficiaries after your death.  Assuming that your wills contain the appropriate language that meets both federal and state requirements for a valid disclaimer, your beneficiary can make decisions that are based on your family’s situation and tax laws that are in effect long after your will was prepared.  And the best part is that they have up to nine months after your death to disclaim – so their decision can be based on your family circumstances and the tax laws that are in effect at the time.

Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan may become an even more valuable estate planning tool after the legislation that I call the Death of the Stretch IRA is passed.  Please stop back soon for an update.

-Jim

For more information on this topic, please visit our Death of the Stretch IRA resource.

 

P.S. Did you miss a video blog post?  Here are the past video blog posts in this video series.

Will New Rules for Inherited IRAs Mean the Death of the Stretch IRA?

Are There Any Exceptions to the Death of the Stretch IRA Legislation?

How will your Required Minimum Distributions Work After the Death of the Stretch IRA Legislation?

Can a Charitable Remainder Unitrust (CRUT) Protect your Heirs from the Death of the Stretch IRA?

What Should You Be Doing Now to Protect your Heirs from the Death of the Stretch IRA?

How Does The New DOL Fiduciary Rule Affect You?

Why is the Death of the Stretch IRA legislation likely to pass?

The Exclusions for the Death of the Stretch IRA

Using Gifting and Life Insurance as a Solution to the Death of the Stretch IRA

Using Roth Conversions as a Possible Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA

How Lange’s Cascading Beneficiary Plan can help protect your family against the Death of the Stretch IRA

How Flexible Estate Planning Can be a Solution for Death of the Stretch IRA

New Social Security Rule Will Hurt Women by Eliminating Benefits Options

James Lange, CPA/Attorney, Advises Married Couples Ages 62-70 to Apply and Suspend NOW. After April 29, 2016, it will be too late!

In early November, President Obama signed the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 into law and the repercussions are devastating to the married women of our country.

Pittsburgh – December 16, 2015Lange Financial Group, James Lange, Pittsburgh, Social SecurityMarried women, statistically the widows of the future, will pay a high price due to the changes that the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 has made to Social Security. Pittsburgh attorney and CPA James Lange takes action by releasing audio and video presentations as well as transcripts and a report that will help couples ages 62-70 navigate this new rule and protect their benefits while they still can!

SOCIAL SECURITY SURVIVOR BENEFITS ARE CRITICAL TO WOMEN

The financial well-being of widows is often dependent upon the choices that are made while their spouses are still alive. Spousal and survivor Social Security benefit choices can mean the difference between living comfortably in retirement and falling under the poverty line for women whose spouses leave them behind. Widows are commonly younger than their deceased husbands and the Social Security benefits they have earned, especially in the Boomer generation, are commonly less than that of their deceased husbands. This means that a widow will depend on collecting survivor benefits, often for many years, based on the benefits to which their deceased spouses were entitled.

“One of the best things a husband can do to protect his wife in widowhood is to maximize his own Social Security benefits. One technique that we use with our clients is apply & suspend.” James Lange of Pittsburgh-based, Lange Financial Group, LLC comments. “The law prior to the Bipartisan Act allowed the husband to apply for, and then suspend collection of his benefits, while allowing his wife to collect a spousal benefit. It was a win-win for our clients!”

This technique was used strategically to maximize the husband’s and wife’s long-term benefits. That, unfortunately, is coming to an end, with the exception of certain couples who take the appropriate action between now and April 29, 2016. For many couples, the income stream from spousal benefits in the previously allowed apply and suspend technique made it possible (or at least more palatable) for the husband to wait until age 70 to collect Social Security, thus maximizing their benefits.

“This new law cuts off that income stream, making it if not impossible, at least more difficult, for husbands to choose to delay collection of their benefits.” Lange warns, “Unfortunately, it is the widows of these husbands who cannot maximize their Social Security benefits who will be left in reduced circumstances for the rest of their lives.”

JIM LANGE’S ADVICE

DO NOT WAIT. Congress has eliminated one of the best Social Security maximization strategies. Fortunately, some recipients may be grandfathered already and others could be grandfathered if they act between now and April 29, 2016. Others will have to make do with the new laws. In either case, now is the time to review your options. We have posted a one hour audio with a written transcript explaining the old law, the new law and the transition rules. Readers can go to www.paytaxeslater.com to access this audio and transcript.

ABOUT JAMES LANGE Jim Lange, Pittsburgh, Social Security

James Lange, CPA/Attorney is a nationally-known Roth IRA and retirement plan distribution expert. He’s also the best-selling author of three editions of Retire Secure! and The Roth Revolution: Pay Taxes Once and Never Again. He hosts a bi-weekly financial radio show, The Lange Money Hour, where he has welcomed numerous guests over the years including top experts in the fields of Social Security, IRAs, and investments.

With over 30 years of experience, Jim and his team have drafted over 2,000 wills and trusts with a focus on flexibility and meeting the unique needs of each client.

Jim’s recommendations have appeared 35 times in The Wall Street Journal, 23 times in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, The New York Times, Newsweek, Money magazine, Smart Money and Reader’s Digest. His articles have appeared in The Journal of Retirement Planning, Financial Planning, The Tax Adviser (AICPA), and other top publications. Most recently he has had two peer-reviewed articles published on Social Security maximization in the prestigious Trusts & Estates magazine.

To learn more, or sign up for their newsletter, visit www.paytaxeslater.com.

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4 Reasons Why We’re Excited that Retire Secure! is Interactive on the Web!

If you haven’t made your way to www.langeretirementbook.com yet, now is the time!

Here at the Lange Financial Group, LLC, we are very excited to bring you an interactive version of Retire Secure! A Guide to Getting the Most Out of What You’ve Got.

Reason #1 – The entire book is on this website. Yes, all 420 pages of the book, including the front and back covers, all about the best strategies for retirement and estate planning.

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Reason #2 – The book is divided into chapters for ease of reading. Meaning, you don’t have to flip through 400-some pages to get to Chapter 11 – The Best Ways to Transfer Wealth and Cut Taxes for the Next Generation.

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Reason #3 – We honestly haven’t seen anything like this before. Granted, I’ve read magazines on viewers where you can flip the pages as you read. But not a website for a book that includes a viewer, as well as a forum where readers can engage with each other.

The comments are moderated by the Lange Financial Group, LLC staff and myself. One of us will reply to your comment as soon as we can. To leave a comment, all you need to do is connect with your Amazon, Facebook, or LinkedIn account. This measure is for your protection, as well as ours. We don’t want spammers posting comments or incorrect information about such an important topic.

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Reason #4 – We are hoping this interactive website encourages you to purchase the book! Retire Secure! is available from Amazon and JamesLange.com. Once you’ve read the book, feel free to return to LangeRetirementBook.com to ask questions, as well as Amazon and Goodreads to review the book for the benefit of others.

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How Advisors Should Handle the IRA and Retirement Plan Beneficiary Form

retirement-plan-beneficiary-form-trusts-the-roth-revolution-james-langeThe ability to know what to do with an IRA or retirement plan beneficiary form can often be detrimental.

First, know we are on shaky ground. The conservative and proper legal advice is to request the client have their estate attorney fill out the beneficiary designation forms.

There are several advantages of having an estate attorney fill out the forms

  • Eliminates or drastically reduces your exposure for not filling out the form correctly and consistent with the clients’ wishes
  • Presumably, the estate attorney has a “big picture” of how the estate will be distributed and the IRA and retirement plan beneficiary designation is an important piece to that entire puzzle

For most traditional clients, I prefer the plan described in chapter 12 of Retire Secure! (Wiley, 2006). The chapter, “The Ideal Beneficiary Designation of Your Retirement Plan” describes what I consider the “master plan”.

Assume that you have a traditional family with children and grandchildren or even the potential to have grandchildren in the future. Let’s also assume that your client and their spouses trust each other completely and the client’s children are by now responsible adults (if not, see the discussion about trusts below).

Primary Beneficiary:

My spouse __________________

Contingent beneficiary

My children______________, ___________, and __________equally, per stirpes

Per stirpes is Latin for by representation. Adding per stirpes is critical. Let’s assume one of your client’s children either predeceases your client or your client’s child wants to disclaim a portion of the inherited IRA to their children, i.e. your client’s grandchildren. Without the words per stirpes, (assuming that the form does not have a box to check to indicate a per stirpes designation), the share of the predeceased or disclaiming child would not go to their children, but rather to their siblings, because the majority of beneficiary forms do not assume a per stirpes distribution unless you specifically state per stirpes in the designation. Presumably, most of your clients do not want to disinherit their grandchildren. Without per stirpes, you could have a grandchild that not only lost their parent, but also lost any inheritance they may have used for support, education, etc.

I also recommend putting current addresses and social security numbers on the IRA or retirement plan beneficiary designation.

Please note, however, that even this solution is only a partial and temporary solution. This solution still allows the possibility of having your client’s grandchild (or child if they are young) drinking $1,000 per bottle champagne to celebrate their purchase of a new Hummer on their 21st birthday.

So, to do the job right, you should name a well drafted trust, either a dedicated trust or a trust that is currently part of the client’s will or living trust, for the benefit of grandchildren (or children if client’s children are young and/or not sufficiently mature to handle an inheritance). In addition, you need at least one trust for each set of your client’s children’s children. There are lots of variations on these trusts, but for the IRA beneficiary purposes, they must meet 6 specific conditions in order to preserve the “stretch IRA” for the grandchildren.

Therefore, what will be a combination of practical, yet also proper advice is to fill out the forms the way I have suggested and recommend both orally and in writing that your client see a qualified estate planning attorney to properly fill out the IRA and retirement plan beneficiary forms.

-Jim

Jim Lange, Retirement and Estate Planning A nationally recognized IRA, Roth IRA conversion, and 401(k) expert, he is a regular speaker to both consumers and professional organizations. Jim is the creator of the Lange Cascading Beneficiary Plan™, a benchmark in retirement planning with the flexibility and control it offers the surviving spouse, and the founder of The Roth IRA Institute, created to train and educate financial advisors.

Jim’s strategies have been endorsed by The Wall Street Journal (33 times), Newsweek, Money Magazine, Smart Money, Reader’s Digest, Bottom Line, and Kiplinger’s. His articles have appeared in Bottom Line, Trusts and Estates Magazine, Financial Planning, The Tax Adviser, Journal of Retirement Planning, and The Pennsylvania Lawyer magazine.

Jim is the best-selling author of Retire Secure! (Wiley, 2006 and 2009), endorsed by Charles Schwab, Larry King, Ed Slott, Jane Bryant Quinn, Roger Ibbotson and The Roth Revolution, Pay Taxes Once and Never Again endorsed by Ed Slott, Natalie Choate and Bob Keebler.

If you’d like to be reminded as to when the book is coming out please fill out the form below.

Thank you.

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